Graduate Student Affiliates

List of Affiliates

Fernando Amador

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fernando Amador is a Ph.D. candidate in the History department with a focus on environmental history in Mexico.

Themes: Environmental Justice Studies, Immigration and Mobility Studies, Race and Social Justice Studies


Spencer Austin

Spencer Austin is a doctoral student in the History Department who studies the intersection of labor, migration, and radicalism by focusing on the transnational history of anarchism.

Themes: Labor, Class, and Economic Policy Studies; Immigration and Mobility Studies; Race and Social Justice Studies


Adam Blair

Adam Blair is a PhD candidate in the Philosophy department. His dissertation focuses on education through art and argues that spectatorship can be a powerful pedagogical and creative movement which can address structural inequality.

Themes: Carceral Studies, Race and Social Justice Studies


Lance Boos

Lance Boos is a Ph.D. candidate in the History department studying Early America and the Atlantic World with a research interest in the music of the American Revolution and music as an Atlantic commodity. Boos is also interested in US constitutional history, with a critical eye toward the ways in which inequality and anti-democratic thought are ingrained in America’s founding documents.

Themes: Race and Social Justice Studies


Sarah Bannon

Sarah Bannon is a Ph.D. candidate in Clinical Psychology. Bannon’s research is broadly concerned with interpersonal relationships, particularly families and couples, as well as interpersonal aggression and conflict. For the past seven years, Bannon has contributed to projects aimed at improving the effectiveness of interventions for court-mandated perpetrators of domestic assault. Bannon also serves as a therapist and researcher for individuals with traumatic brain injuries, working with clients who encounter a host of barriers to independence including access to healthcare, disability services, and socioeconomic inequalities.

Theme: Carceral Studies


Zinnia Capó

Zinnia Capó is a PhD candidate in History who the international nature of opium trade in the early twentieth century, it’s political and economic consequence, and the impact legal and social changes had on communities on both sides of the western edge of the US-México border. Her dissertation also examines the role racism and xenophobia plays in punitive antidrug legislation.

Themes: Race and Social Justice Studies, Carceral Studies


Ximena Lopez Carillo

Ximena Lopez Carrillo is a Ph.D. candidate in the History Department with a research focus on the production of psychiatric and psychological knowledge about the Mexican-American population in the United States during the 1960s and 1970s.

Themes: Carceral Studies; Immigration and Mobility Studies; Race and Social Justice Studies; Labor, Class, and Economic Policy Studies


Carolyn Coburn

Carolyn is a Ph.D. candidate in the Sociology Department. Her research interests include the global political economy of the environment, international organization, and development. Of particular interest is the role of transnational capital in resource access and inequality. Her dissertation research focuses on the impacts of privatization, multilateral aid lending, and structural adjustment policy on clean water access within the lower and middle income countries.

Themes: Environmental Justice Studies


Sarah Davis

Sarah Davis is a Ph.D. student in the English department working on a Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality studies certificate.

Themes: Environmental Justice Studies, Race and Social Justice Studies


Andy Eicher

Andy Eicher is a PhD candidate in the Department of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies department studying cultural representations of HIV/AIDS contemporarily as well as historically. His dissertation is a political economic critique of the health care system in the United States, with particular attention to the disparities that disproportionately have consequences for vulnerable populations, including poor and working poor queer people of color.

Themes: Labor, Class, and Economic Policy Studies; Race and Social Justice Studies


Maximilian Gregor Hepach

Maximilian Gergor Hepach is a Ph.D. candidate in the Philosophy department. Hepach’s philosophical interests lie in tracing the experience of weather and climate through different philosophical, historical, and cultural contexts.

Theme: Environmental Justice Studies


Tara Holmes

Tara Holmes is a PhD candidate in the Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies department whose research investigates how rural, working-class female queers construct and articulate their identity through the reception of popular culture representations of queerness. Tara uses her academic training to bring a queer/feminist cultural studies lens to bare on the public policy research she does in West Virginia. She is writing a comprehensive policy brief exploring the inequities faced by women and gender non-conforming people in the Mountain State, along with data-driven policy suggestions such as enacting a state-wide Earned Income Tax Credit to help economically disadvantaged single mothers. She is also writing a policy brief that looks at the intersections of criminal justice system, racial justice, and the opioid epidemic.

Themes: Labor, Class, and Economic Policy Studies


Howard Huang

Howard Huang is a PhD candidate in the Clinical Psychology department who specializes in gender and sexual identity development between ages 0 to 18. Their research scrutinizes the way societal hegemonies transact with intrapersonal psychic operations. As a student of Dialectical Marxism, they argue that the core of modern suffering is a political-economic struggle towards liberation.

Themes: Labor, Class, and Economic Policy Studies


Emmett Larsen

Emmett Larsen is a clinical psychology PhD student. His research interests are broadly related to the ways in which people form beliefs and attitudes—for example political views as well as biases related to societal groups. He is particularly interested in understanding and combating the forces underlying racial and gender inequality.

Themes: Race and Social Justice Studies


Hyosun Lee

Hyosun Lee is a PhD candidate in the Cultural Analysis and Comparative Literature department whose research interests include refugee literature, solidarity, and human rights, with a focus on women refugees. He argues that Subaltern bodies of women refugees can contest the nationalist idea surrounding the border space by claiming their rights to their bodies. Sexual abuses and threats against women during their border crossing show us that the vulnerability of women’s bodies is different from that of men’s bodies because of their different sexuality.

Themes: Immigration and Mobility Studies


Gregory Lella

Gregory Lella is a Ph.D. candidate in the history department with research that examines how police brutality and incarceration affected the lives of Latinx and Native American borderlanders in southern Arizona after 1964.

Themes: Carceral Studies, Immigration and Mobility Studies, Race and Social Justice Studies


Michael Lenmark

Michael Lenmark is a PhD candidate in the Sociology department whose research investigates the relationship between changes in the level of wealth and income inequality and attitudes toward the social safety net and redistribution. His work also examines the relationship between xenophobic attitudes and attitudes toward various redistributive policies.

Themes: Labor, Class, and Economic Mobility Studies; Immigration and Mobility Studies


Willie Mack

Willie Mack is a PhD student in the History department whose research interests include mass incarceration, economic inequality, race relations and radicalism, with a particular interest in how mass incarceration has impacted the Civil Rights movement throughout the twentieth century and how the incarceration of thousands of poor and people of color has changed our understanding of social justice and inequality. He also has an interest in neoliberalism and its impact on migration, foreign policy and the carceral state from the 1970s-2000s.

Themes: Carceral Studies, Race and Social Justice Studies


Kevin McElrath

Kevin McElrath is a Ph.D. student in the Sociology department researching how social class impacts outcomes in the labor market and educational institutions.

Themes: Labor, Class, and Economic Policy Studies


Brittany Miller

Brittany Miller is a PhD candidate in the Social and Health area of the Psychology department. Her research interests include psychosocial issues surrounding breast cancer and breast cancer risk in racial/ethnic minority women. Her current work focuses on logistical, social, psychological, cultural and immigration-related barriers to mammography screening, the most effective method of breast cancer detection, that are experienced by women of color. This includes discriminatory treatment by the health care system, policy that prevents women’s access to quality care, and competing threats to survival in communities of color that result in lack of prioritization of self- care and preventive and detection-related health behaviors.

Themes: Labor, Class, and Economic Policy Studies; Immigration and Mobility Studies; Race and Social Justice Studies


Caroline Propersi-Grossman

Caroline Propersi-Grossman is a Ph.D candidate in the history department. Her research interest is in the creation and meaning of class and cultural identity.

Themes: Labor, Class, and Economic Policy Studies, Social Justice Studies


James Puglin

Jamie Puglin is a Ph.D. candidate in the Sociology Department with a research focus on social justice, activism, and issues of race, class, and gender. Her dissertation focuses on social movement organizations that use fan communities to recruit young people to activism.

Theme: Race and Social Justice Studies


Sarah Santos

Sarah Santos is a Ph.D. candidate in the English department whose researching biopolitics, neoliberalism and ecocriticism in late 20th and 21st century literature, examining the boundaries between human and nonhuman bodies and the way in which contemporary authors work to redefine the concept of the human through the intertwining of capital, technology and environment. Her dissertation traces trajectories of becoming post/human in dystopian Global North/Global South literature in relation to the proliferation of spaces of security that emerge with, and within, neoliberal discourse.

Themes: Immigration and Mobility Studies, Environmental Justice Studies


Jenny Strandberg

Jenny Strandberg is a Ph.D. candidate in the Philosophy department with a certificate in Women’s and Gender studies and a research interest in environmental philosophy.

Theme: Environmental Justice Studies


Yalile Suriel

Yalile Suriel is a Ph.D. candidate in the History department with research interests in mass incarceration, policing, and surveillance in 20th century American history. She has a specific interest in Black/Brown power movements of the 1960s.

Themes: Carceral Studies, Immigration and Mobility Studies, Race and Social Justice Studies


Janet Vu

Janet Vu is a PhD candidate in the Ecology and Evolution department whose mission is to reduce species extinction, fight for environmental equity and foster the harmonious coexistence between humans and nature. Her research focuses on reforestation in southern Costa Rica, a conservation strategy that protects wildlife by providing new habitats, while simultaneously bolstering the local economy by replenishing natural resources.

Themes: Environmental Justice Studies, Race and Social Justice Studies


Caleb Ward

Caleb Ward is a Ph.D. candidate in Philosophy, with an advanced graduate certificate in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. His dissertation, “Sexual Ethics in Ambiguous Intimate Encounters: Addressing the Limits of Consent,” explores how and why people are often harmed in sex even when consent is present.

Themes: Race and Social Justice, Carceral Studies


What Graduate Affiliates Do / How to Apply (from our by laws):

  1. Affiliation with the Center is open to graduate students currently enrolled and in good standing at SBU who have research, teaching, or outreach interests that significantly address the themes of the center.
  2. Graduate student associates will be expected to help coordinate and publicize our programs with undergraduate groups and campus organizations that address center themes.
  3. Applications for graduate affiliate membership shall be nominated to the Steering Committee by themselves or someone else.
    1. Applications must be submitted to the Center Director and should include:
      1. a description of the research interests of the student and key departments and programs the student regards as core to their intellectual community on campus
      2. a digital photograph of the student.
    2. This information will be posted on the Center website unless the student requests that it be omitted for some reason.
    3. The Steering Committee approves affiliate status by a majority vote.
  4. Renewal: Once elected, graduate and community associates will receive a written request from the Director annually, each fall, asking if they wish to renew their membership. They are expected to participate regularly in Center activities, and if they fail to do so, the Director can recommend to the Steering Committee that their graduate student associate status be rescinded.
  5. When graduate student associates complete their degree programs and depart from the university, they are typically designated as “CSISJ Alumni” by an affirmative vote of the Steering Committee. Once assigned, this is a permanent designation unless the Steering Committee votes to remove it; it does not require ongoing involvement with Center activities.