Events

Fall 2018

Wednesday, November 7th: Sexual Harassment and the Construction of Ethnographic Knwoledge

Time: 1 – 2:30 PM
Location: Humanities 1008, Stony Brook University

In collaboration with GSEU, WGSS, others

Patricia L. Richards (Sociology, UGA)

Click HERE for more information!
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Sunday, November 11: A Matter of Saving Lives: Adopting Evidence-Based Solutions to Stopping Gun Violence in Our Schools (tentative tittle)

Time: 2 – 5:00 PM
Location: SAC Ballroom A

Organizing in collaboration with Science Advocacy of Long Island (SALI), Stony Brook Public Health Program, Long Island March for Our Lives, other activist groups

Click HERE for more information!
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Thursday November 29: Power, Capital, and Immigrant Detention Rights (Tentative Title)

Time: 1:00 -2:30 pm
Location: TBA

Julia Morris, Post-doctoral Fellow, Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility, The New School

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Thursday, November 29: Forum: Changing the Narrative Around Race and Racial Dynamics on Long Island

Location: Hilton Garden Inn, Stony Brook
Time: 6 – 8:00 PM

Co-sponsored with ERASE Racism
Central Suffolk version of several forums to be held around Long Island to marshal broad participation and support for this initiative spearheaded by ERASE Racism

Click HERE for more information!
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Tentative Spring 2019 Calendar

February:

Premilla Nadsen (Bard) on history and current efforts organizing domestic workers event

 

Late February:

Housing and Inequality

Nathan Connolly (Johns Hopkins) on homeownership and black capitalism

Kim Manturuk (Duke and UNC-Chapel Hill, social dimensions of homeownership

Elaine Gross (ERASE Racism) on housing and discrimination on Long Island

 

March:

Poor People’s Movements, Then and Now

Michael Honey (University of Washington—Seattle) on ML King, Jr.’s Poor People’s Movement

Representatives of national and Long Island Poor People’s Campaign

 

April 4:

2019 Allen Lecture on Race and Class in America:

William Darity (Duke) “The Subaltern Middle Class”

Panel on Higher Education in an Age of Inequality

 

Late April:

Native Americans and racism event

Past Events

Fall 2018

Thursday, November 1st: #MeToo Post Kavanaugh Town Hall

In collaboration with the Graduate Student Employment Union (GSEU) and the Women’s Gender and Sexuality Studies Department (WGS)

Time: 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM

Location: Stony Brook University, Social and Behavioral Sciences Building, room N320 (LACS Center)

Click HERE for more information!

 

Thursday, October 25: Mini-Conference: “Public Universities and Neoliberalism Today”

Location: SAC Ballroom A

Schedule:

1:00 – 2:30 PM
“Austerity Blues: Fighting for the Soul of Public Higher Education Today”
Michael Fabricant (CUNY) and Stephen Brier (CUNY)

2:45 -6:00 PM
Panel and Breakout Sessions on “Work, Unions, and Public Universities in the Northeast: Today’s Struggles and Ways Forward”

Panelists:
Anne Mcleer (New Faculty Majority)
Tony Menelik Van Der Meer, University of Massachusetts-Boston (SAVE UMB)
Anne Roschelle, SUNY-New Paltz (Radical University Professionals)
Jason Stranahan, CUNY Graduate School (CUNY Struggle)
Michael Fabricant, CUNY (CUNY Rising)

 

Click HERE for more information.

 

Monday October 29: Panel Series on “Work, Unions and (In)Justice at Stony Brook in the Wake of the Janus Decision”

Location: SAC Ballroom B

Panelists to include local union and faculty governance representatives.

Click HERE for more information!

 

Mid-October: Opening of “Deported” Online Exhibit, CSISJP Website

Rachel Woolf, Photographer, Winner of “Emerging Lens” Award sponsored by Art Works Studio, Chicago

 

Thursday, September 13th 2018: Panel on “Countering Fascism in the Philippines”

Time: 1:00 – 2:30 PM
Location: SBS N318

Elmer Labog, Chair of the Kilusang Mayo Uno of the Philippines: “’There’s Blood in Your Condiments: The Nutriasia Workers’ Strike and the Filipino Labor Movement”
Nerissa Balce, Associate Professor of Asian American Studies, Stony Brook University: “Dark Lens: The Filipino Camera in Duterte’s Republic”

Click HERE for more information.

 

Late September: Opening of “Dark Lens: The Filipino Camera in Duterte’s Republic” Online Exhibit, CSISJP Website

Curated by Nerissa Balce (Stony Brook University), Pia Arboleda (University of Hawaii) and Francine Marquez (Journalist)

Click HERE for more information.

 

Wednesday, September 26th: Panel on “Deportation Under the Lens: What it Means, Where it Now Stands”

Time: 1:00 to 2:30 PM
Location: Central Reading Room, Melville Library
Moderator: Christopher Sellers, History; Center Director

Panelists:
Rachel Woolf, Photographer, “Deported”
Nancy Hiemstra, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Stony Brook, and author of Deported and Detained
Irma Solis, New York Civil Liberties Union—Suffolk County
Richard Koubek, Long Island Jobs with Justice

Click HERE for more information

 

Wednesday September 26-October 31: Photo Exhibit “Deported” (East Coast Premier)

Rachel Woolf, Photographer, Winner of “Emerging Lens” Award sponsored by Art Works Studio, Chicago

Location: Central Reading Room, Melville Library

Summer 2018

June 6-9, 2018: “Class at the Border: Migration, Confinement and (Im)mobility,” Annual Conference of the Working-Class Studies Association, Student Activities Center

Student Activities Center, Stony Brook University

Against the backdrop of globalization, where capital flows across borders more easily than people, we are living in increasingly walled-off societies. This conference, featuring interdisciplinary scholars from around the world as well as artists, writers, and activists, will explore how explicit recognition and analysis of class can deepen our understanding of the structures and ideas that divide individuals, communities, societies, and nations across the globe.

Featured Plenaries:

June 7, 7-9 pm, Provost Lecture: “The Things That Divide Us: Meditations”

Rhonda Williams, Professor and John L. Seigenthaler Chair in American History, Vanderbilt University, and Organization of American Historians Distinguished Lecturer

(free and open to the public)

June 8, 1:30-3:30 pm: “The Nation Presents: The Future of Labor”

Moderator: Sarah Leonard, Executive Editor, In Justice Today

The Nation Contributing Writers: Michelle Chen, Bryce Covert, John Washington

(open to the public, suggested donation $25)

 

Spring 2018

February 5, 2018: Works-in-Progress Series #1

Our Works-in-Progress series will happen three times during the semester and features scholars presenting their new and evolving research projects involving this year’s theme, WALLS, MIGRATION, CONFINEMENT AND THE PROBLEM OF MOBILITY. A discussion and Q&A will follow the talks!

Logan McBride, “The Racial Geography of New York State Prisons, 1960s-1980s” (CUNY Graduate Center, History, PhD Candidate)

Miranda Saenz, “Dis(ease): Silent Genocide on Native Land” (Stony Brook University, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, PhD candidate)

February 28, 2018: Todd Miller Lecture “Storming the Wall: Climate Change, Migration, and Homeland Security”

Join us for a lecture and Q&A with Todd Miller regarding climate change, migration, and homeland security. The talk is based on Miller’s book (linked above), Storming the Wall: Climate Change, Migration, and Homeland Security, which Kirkus Reviews calls “A galvanizing forecast of global warming’s endgame and a powerful indictment of America’s current stance.”

March 7, 2018: Film Screening, Clinica de Migrantes Postponed to April 25 due to weather

Followed by Panel Discussion featuring Dr. Steve Larson, profiled in the film, Dr. Stalin Vilcarromero, Stony Brook WTC Wellness Program, and Tiffany Joseph, Associate Professor of Sociology at Stony Brook.

March 19, 2018: Works-in-Progress Series #2

Our Works-in-Progress series will happen three times during the semester and features scholars presenting their new and evolving research projects involving this year’s theme, WALLS, MIGRATION, CONFINEMENT AND THE PROBLEM OF MOBILITY. A discussion and Q&A will follow the talks!

Yalda Hamidi, “Iranian Patriotic Womanhood Confined: Paying the Price for Literary Home Making” (Stony Brook University, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, PhD candidate)

Tim August, “The Best of Both Worlds: Countering Refugee Exceptionalism and Perpetual Forgetting” (Stony Brook University, Cultural and Comparative Literature, Professor)

Giuseppe Gazzola, “Not a Matter of Race, Rather a Matter of Culture: Italians in India, 1871-1914” (Stony Brook University, European Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, Professor)

March 22, 2018: Theodore Allen Lecture on “The Subaltern Middle Class,” Dr. William A. Darity, followed by a roundtable discussion on higher education in an age of inequality, featuring Dr.  Tressie McMillan Cottom, Dr. Darrick Hamilton, and Dr. Robert Kelchen postponed until April 4, 2010 due to weather

April 3, 2018: “We Change Genocide: Criminal Justice in Chicago Today and Yesterday,” with Mariame Kaba, Artist-Organizer-Activist, and Touissant Losier, author of forthcoming War for the City: Black Chicago and the Rise of the Carceral State

April 16, 2018: Works-in-Progress Series #3

Our Works-in-Progress series will happen three times during the semester and features scholars presenting their new and evolving research projects involving this year’s theme, WALLS, MIGRATION, CONFINEMENT AND THE PROBLEM OF MOBILITY. A discussion and Q&A will follow the talks!

April 25, 2018: Film Screening, Clinica de Migrantes 

Followed by Panel Discussion featuring Dr. Steve Larson, profiled in the film, Dr. Stalin Vilcarromero, Stony Brook WTC Wellness Program, and Tiffany Joseph, Associate Professor of Sociology at Stony Brook.

When: Wednesday, April 25, 1-2:30 pm

Where: Wang Center

April 25, 2018: Student and Community Activism Pop Up: Current Causes and Opportunities

Thinking about getting involved in a social or political cause?  You’re not alone.  Over the past couple of years, movements, activism, and protests have swelled nationwide, also across Long Island.  Come hear from leading Long Island activists themselves: what current dilemmas energize them, and how you too can lend a hand.

What: Student and Community Activism Pop Up: Current Causes and Opportunities
When: Wednesday, April 25, 1-2:30 pm
Where: Humanities 1008


Fall 2017

November 16, 2017: The Border Wall: What it Means for New York, Hilton Garden Inn, Stony Brook University

The New York City region and Long Island in particular have become flash-points for a heated public debate over current immigration policies, epitomized by the proposal to build a Border Wall. Scholars, community leaders, and activists will weigh in on a two-part panel at the Hilton Garden Inn at Stony Brook. This event is free and open to the public.

November 14, 2017: Map-A-Thon for Puerto Rico Relief and Beyond, Health Sciences Library, East Campus

Due to the great success of our first map-a-thon, we decided to sponsor a second one, this time on East Campus. Students and faculty stopped by the Health Sciences Library to provide disaster relief to Puerto Rico and beyond via open-source mapping.

October 17, 2017: Dr. Deirdre Conlon, “Carceral Interstices: Legitimacy on the Move” 

Dr. Deirdre Conlon is lecturer/ assistant professor in critical human geography at the University of Leeds. Her research examines tensions around migration and policies and practices designed to control and manage immigrants and citizenship more broadly. Her projects include examining the ‘intimate’ economies of immigration detention in the US, the proliferation of carceral spaces, the everyday material, social and political consequences of ‘securitization’ as well as possibilities for activism that contests injustices that coincide with these developments. Publications include: Intimate economies of immigration detention: critical perspectives (2016) (published by Routledge, co-edited with Nancy Hiemstra) as well as recent journal articles in Territory, Politics, GovernanceProgress in Human Geography; and ACME: An International E-Journal for Critical Geographies.

Abstract: Recent scholarship on carceral spaces and circuits invites attention beyond the walls of prisons and immigration detention facilities, and calls for investigations of the carceral interstices­—sites including short term holding rooms, police precincts, reporting centers, courts, and transportation systems—where spatial control is exercised and where individuals can be confined in the name of state authority. As individuals pass along a trajectory of these interstitial spaces, they come face to face with exertions of control as well as with efforts to elaborate and instantiate legitimacy under circumstances where an array of state and non-state actors are involved in producing and performing makeshift spaces of authority. Drawing on new and ongoing research in the UK and US, and from scholarly work in critical migration studies and feminist political geography, this paper has three interconnected aims: first, to identify and map legitimacy on the move, second to consider its impact for those who experience it, and, finally, to conceptualize its meaning and implications for understanding carceral spaces in contemporary society.

October 11, 2017: Map-A-Thon for Puerto Rico Relief, Melville Library, Stony Brook University

Students and faculty are invited to stop by Melville Library to provide disaster relief in Puerto Rico via open-source mapping. The Red Cross in Puerto Rico has set up digital mapping tasks for college campuses that will help ongoing relief efforts. No prior mapping experience is needed for this event.

Update: See our video of this event here.

CFP: Works-in-Progress, “Walls: Migration, Confinement, and (Im)mobility, Due October 7, 2017

The Works-in-Progress group, happening three times on Stony Brook’s West campus in the 2017-2018 academic year, asks three scholars per session to present their work to an audience that will provide valuable discussion and feedback. This event is open to faculty, students, and independent scholars. This year’s theme is “Walls: Migration, Confinement, and (Im)mobility.”

September 20, 2017: DACA Teach-in

In collaboration with the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literature, the Humanities Institute, and the Caribbean Studies Center, CSISJP has supported the DACA Teach-In, in which discussion and presentations reveal the impact of DACA at Stony Brook University. It is an opportunity to share resources and strategies and to support DACA students.


Spring 2017

April 12, 2017: Race, Gender, Public Health, Incarceration

Faculty from the College of Arts and Sciences, in conjunction with activist groups, speak about the various ways women, communities of color, and the poor will be impacted by the current administration’s agenda.

March 21, 2017: Teach-in on Immigration Issues

Featuring faculty from the College of Arts and Sciences as well as students, representatives of local community organizations, and activists, the teach-in on immigration issues will investigate the changing immigration policy and its implications.

February 22, 2017: Refugees and the Immigration Ban: Repercussions and Resistance

In a three part teach-in and global discussion, faculty from the College of Arts and Sciences who have direct experience with the immigration ban speak about the intersection of social work, mental health, and government services.

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