Events

Spring 2018

February 5, 2018: Works-in-Progress Series #1

Our Works-in-Progress series will happen three times during the semester and features scholars presenting their new and evolving research projects involving this year’s theme, WALLS, MIGRATION, CONFINEMENT AND THE PROBLEM OF MOBILITY. A discussion and Q&A will follow the talks!

Logan McBride, “The Racial Geography of New York State Prisons, 1960s-1980s” (CUNY Graduate Center, History, PhD Candidate)

Miranda Saenz, “Dis(ease): Silent Genocide on Native Land” (Stony Brook University, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, PhD candidate)

February 28, 2018: Todd Miller Lecture “Storming the Wall: Climate Change, Migration, and Homeland Security”

Join us for a lecture and Q&A with Todd Miller regarding climate change, migration, and homeland security. The talk is based on Miller’s book (linked above), Storming the Wall: Climate Change, Migration, and Homeland Security, which Kirkus Reviews calls “A galvanizing forecast of global warming’s endgame and a powerful indictment of America’s current stance.”

March 7, 2018: Film Screening, Clinica de Migrantes 

Followed by Panel Discussion featuring Dr. Robert Larson, profiled in the film, Dr. Benjamin Luft, Stony Brook WTC Wellness Program, and Tiffany Joseph, Associate Professor of Sociology at Stony Brook.

March 19, 2018: Works-in-Progress Series #2

Our Works-in-Progress series will happen three times during the semester and features scholars presenting their new and evolving research projects involving this year’s theme, WALLS, MIGRATION, CONFINEMENT AND THE PROBLEM OF MOBILITY. A discussion and Q&A will follow the talks!

Yalda Hamidi, “Iranian Patriotic Womanhood Confined: Paying the Price for Literary Home Making” (Stony Brook University, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, PhD candidate)

Tim August, “The Best of Both Worlds: Countering Refugee Exceptionalism and Perpetual Forgetting” (Stony Brook University, Cultural and Comparative Literature, Professor)

Giuseppe Gazzola, “Not a Matter of Race, Rather a Matter of Culture: Italians in India, 1871-1914” (Stony Brook University, European Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, Professor)

March 22, 2018: Theodore Allen Lecture on “The Subaltern Middle Class,” Dr. William A. Darity, followed by a roundtable discussion on higher education in an age of inequality, featuring Dr.  Tressie McMillan Cottom, Dr. Darrick Hamilton, and Dr. Robert Kelchen

April 3, 2018: “We Change Genocide: Criminal Justice in Chicago Today and Yesterday,” with Mariame Kaba, Artist-Organizer-Activist, and Touissant Losier, author of forthcoming War for the City: Black Chicago and the Rise of the Carceral State

April 16, 2018: Works-in-Progress Series #3

Our Works-in-Progress series will happen three times during the semester and features scholars presenting their new and evolving research projects involving this year’s theme, WALLS, MIGRATION, CONFINEMENT AND THE PROBLEM OF MOBILITY. A discussion and Q&A will follow the talks!

April 24, 2018: Roundtable on Student Activism: Legacies and Possibilities


Fall 2017

November 16, 2017: The Border Wall: What it Means for New York, Hilton Garden Inn, Stony Brook University

The New York City region and Long Island in particular have become flash-points for a heated public debate over current immigration policies, epitomized by the proposal to build a Border Wall. Scholars, community leaders, and activists will weigh in on a two-part panel at the Hilton Garden Inn at Stony Brook. This event is free and open to the public.

November 14, 2017: Map-A-Thon for Puerto Rico Relief and Beyond, Health Sciences Library, East Campus

Due to the great success of our first map-a-thon, we decided to sponsor a second one, this time on East Campus. Students and faculty stopped by the Health Sciences Library to provide disaster relief to Puerto Rico and beyond via open-source mapping.

October 17, 2017: Dr. Deirdre Conlon, “Carceral Interstices: Legitimacy on the Move” 

Dr. Deirdre Conlon is lecturer/ assistant professor in critical human geography at the University of Leeds. Her research examines tensions around migration and policies and practices designed to control and manage immigrants and citizenship more broadly. Her projects include examining the ‘intimate’ economies of immigration detention in the US, the proliferation of carceral spaces, the everyday material, social and political consequences of ‘securitization’ as well as possibilities for activism that contests injustices that coincide with these developments. Publications include: Intimate economies of immigration detention: critical perspectives (2016) (published by Routledge, co-edited with Nancy Hiemstra) as well as recent journal articles in Territory, Politics, GovernanceProgress in Human Geography; and ACME: An International E-Journal for Critical Geographies.

Abstract: Recent scholarship on carceral spaces and circuits invites attention beyond the walls of prisons and immigration detention facilities, and calls for investigations of the carceral interstices­—sites including short term holding rooms, police precincts, reporting centers, courts, and transportation systems—where spatial control is exercised and where individuals can be confined in the name of state authority. As individuals pass along a trajectory of these interstitial spaces, they come face to face with exertions of control as well as with efforts to elaborate and instantiate legitimacy under circumstances where an array of state and non-state actors are involved in producing and performing makeshift spaces of authority. Drawing on new and ongoing research in the UK and US, and from scholarly work in critical migration studies and feminist political geography, this paper has three interconnected aims: first, to identify and map legitimacy on the move, second to consider its impact for those who experience it, and, finally, to conceptualize its meaning and implications for understanding carceral spaces in contemporary society.

October 11, 2017: Map-A-Thon for Puerto Rico Relief, Melville Library, Stony Brook University

Students and faculty are invited to stop by Melville Library to provide disaster relief in Puerto Rico via open-source mapping. The Red Cross in Puerto Rico has set up digital mapping tasks for college campuses that will help ongoing relief efforts. No prior mapping experience is needed for this event.

Update: See our video of this event here.

CFP: Works-in-Progress, “Walls: Migration, Confinement, and (Im)mobility, Due October 7, 2017

The Works-in-Progress group, happening three times on Stony Brook’s West campus in the 2017-2018 academic year, asks three scholars per session to present their work to an audience that will provide valuable discussion and feedback. This event is open to faculty, students, and independent scholars. This year’s theme is “Walls: Migration, Confinement, and (Im)mobility.”

September 20, 2017: DACA Teach-in

In collaboration with the Department of Hispanic Languages and Literature, the Humanities Institute, and the Caribbean Studies Center, CSISJP has supported the DACA Teach-In, in which discussion and presentations reveal the impact of DACA at Stony Brook University. It is an opportunity to share resources and strategies and to support DACA students.


Spring 2017

April 12, 2017: Race, Gender, Public Health, Incarceration

Faculty from the College of Arts and Sciences, in conjunction with activist groups, speak about the various ways women, communities of color, and the poor will be impacted by the current administration’s agenda.

March 21, 2017: Teach-in on Immigration Issues

Featuring faculty from the College of Arts and Sciences as well as students, representatives of local community organizations, and activists, the teach-in on immigration issues will investigate the changing immigration policy and its implications.

February 22, 2017: Refugees and the Immigration Ban: Repercussions and Resistance

In a three part teach-in and global discussion, faculty from the College of Arts and Sciences who have direct experience with the immigration ban speak about the intersection of social work, mental health, and government services.

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